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What type of guardianship may a Maryland resident need?

When a person ages, the possibility exists that he or she will lose the ability to properly care for him or herself. This type of situation could arise due to a variety of factors, and when an individual becomes incapacitated, guardianship may become necessary. Appointing a guardian can be a complicated process, and therefore, concerned Maryland residents may want to gain more information.

Maryland parents may wish to address guardianship concerns

The main priority for many parents is to ensure that their children are taken care of. Unfortunately, there are instances in which biological parents may no longer be able to care for their children. Sudden deaths often account for such situations, but rather than leaving it up to the court to decide guardianship, Maryland parents may wish to name their desired guardians. 

Maryland residents may face guardianship, conservatorship issues

Many older individuals often face incapacitation that leaves them unable to care for themselves and their affairs. As a result, an individual or entity may be appointed guardian in order to care for the unable person. Guardianship is a substantial responsibility, and the appointed individual may face issues when it comes to keeping up with a conservatorship or other estate-related area.

MLK estate administration case may interest Maryland residents

When a loved one passes, many family members may have varying roles in the remaining estate. Some individuals may be part of the estate administration, which causes them to be in charge of much of the remaining assets. However, complications can often arise when dealing with property of a deceased loved one, and even years after a death, litigation is possible.

Creating a will may give some structure to Maryland probate cases

Many Maryland residents likely do not want their families to worry about their affairs in the event of their deaths. As a result, individuals often create wills and other estate documents that can help plan how certain assets should be distributed. However, if no will is in place, an estate could be subjected to state laws regarding how property should be bequeathed and who may be entitled to an inheritance. 

Guardianship, trusts may be worth considering in Maryland

Taking the time to create estate plans is an important action that could save families time and stress in the future. There are various aspects that could be addressed in these plans, and guardianship may be among the needs to consider. There are also other important efforts that could help Maryland families avoid lengthy probate proceedings when it comes to property distribution.

Guardianship appointments may concern Maryland residents

When Maryland residents think of appointing a guardian, they may only consider such a need as pertaining to young children. However, a guardianship could also affect older individuals if they were to become incapacitated and unable to make decisions for themselves. In such a situation, a guardian and/or conservator could potentially be appointed by the court in order to make decisions for the incapacitated party unless other arrangements had been made.

Creating guardianship necessary when person incapacitated

Family members in Maryland typically disagree about how a loved one who is incapacitated should be cared for. This is especially true when a large amount of money happens to be involved. In this situation, the court has the ability to create a guardianship.

A guardianship may help one's family

If a person in Maryland is unable to make decisions regarding his or her financial matters or personal care, it is possible for the court to create a guardianship. A guardianship empowers people or a person to make the important personal care and financial decisions for the individual, known as the ward. An attorney can help people establish guardianships after first reviewing the benefits and drawbacks of these legal vehicles.

Maryland attorney provides guidance with a guardianship

For people in Maryland, it is difficult to realize that a loved one may not be able to make their own decisions. This inability could be caused by a sudden accident, mental incapacitation or illness. In the past, many have turned to the attorneys at The Law Offices of Scott Alan Morrison, P.A. for advice with a situation such as this, including the possibility of creating a guardianship.